Season 2011-2012

Concerts

Dialoghi di flauti
Thursday 17 May 2012

2012 Benefit Concert – “Baroquambolesque”
Tuesday 8 May 2012

Piano and Traverso
Thursday 23 February 2012

Leclair’s Violin
Thursday 24 November 2011

Telemann’s Table
Thursday 6 October 2011

Artistic Director’s Note

Inspired more than ever by daring artistic ideas, but with a certain maturity, Les Boréades are launching their 16th season. We know that the concerts we are offering in 2011-2012 will, as in previous years, be both delightfully varied and sure to satisfy your thirst for beautiful music.

As usual, we will be joined by celebrated performers from elsewhere: by violinist Adrian Butterfield, for instance, for a concert dedicated entirely to the chamber music of Jean-Marie Leclair, a great and unjustly neglected composer. We will also be joined by Stephano Bigliano, the distinguished recorder player and current artistic director of Collegium Pro Musica of Genoa, for a rich evening of musical dialogues. Furthermore, your truly will play a program of Galant and Classical sonatas on the traverso. And the season will begin with an enlarged group of eight musicians playing lengthy extracts from Telemann’s sumptuous Tafelmusik.

It is thanks to our loyal public, who keep up with and appreciate what we do, that we remain so enthusiastic. I and the other musicians of Les Boréades are looking forward to a very agreeable 16th season in your company.

Francis Colpron

Dialoghi di flauti

Thursday 17 May 2012, 20:00

Artists
Francis Colpron
Stefano Bagliano

Chapelle Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours
Website
400, rue Saint-Paul Est [métro Champ-de-Mars], Vieux-Montréal, Québec

  • Regular: 28,00$
  • Senior: 23,00$
  • Student: 10,00$

Tickets Boréades Store
Admission: 514-790-1245

Program

Stephano Bagliano, recorder and Artistic Director of the Collegium pro Musica, Genoa – Mostly Italian chamber music

This concert, conceived as a friendly dialogue between recorders, offers a varied and colorful assortment of dances, canzonas, sonatas, and Italian madrigals from the 17th century by Merula, Luzzaschi, Buonamente, Cazzati, and Corelli and, to top all this off, trio sonatas by Bach and Telemann. This conversation, in which the instruments sometimes agree and sometimes compete, will show that, in all this magnificent repertoire, the recorder can more than hold its own as a virtuosic and fully musical instrument. It can render all the very vocal expressiveness so important at the time, while sustaining all of the polyphonic interest created by composers in interweaving lines for the two protagonists.

2012 Benefit Concert – “Baroquambolesque”

Tuesday 8 May 2012, 19:00

Artists
Francis Colpron

Chapelle historique du Bon-Pasteur
Website
100, rue Sherbrooke Est [métro Sherbrooke + autobus 24 Ouest / métro Saint-Laurent + autobus 55 Nord], Montréal, Québec 514-872-5338

  • Regular: 100,00$
  • Senior: 100,00$
  • Student: 100,00$

Tickets Boréades Store
Admission: 514-790-1245

Program

L’événement sera animé par le chroniqueur et humoriste Christopher Hall qui en sera le maître de cérémonie et par Francis Colpron, fondateur de l’ensemble Les Boréades. Les billets sont disponibles à 100$ l’unité et un reçu aux fins d’impôt de 75$ sera remis. Si toutefois vous ne pouvez assister au concert, vous pouvez toujours contribuer par un don déductible d’impôt. Veuillez prendre connaissance de l’invitation pour connaître tous les détails de la soirée.

• Voir le carton d’invitation
• Télécharger le coupon-réponse

piano and Traverso

Thursday 23 February 2012, 20:00

Artists
Francis Colpron

Chapelle Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours
Website
400, rue Saint-Paul Est [métro Champ-de-Mars], Vieux-Montréal, Québec

  • Regular: 28,00$
  • Senior: 23,00$
  • Student: 10,00$

Tickets Boréades Store
Admission: 514-790-1245

Program

Classical chamber music

From 1760 on, the newly invented piano quickly replaced the harpsichord throughout Europe both as a solo and as a chamber-music instrument. Its dynamic and expressive capabilities encouraged the development of new forms both by Classicists, such as Haydn and Mozart, and by the first Romantics. At this same time, the middle of the 18th century, the traverso was immensely popular. Its often melancholic sweetness and subtle colors made it the instrument par excellence for expressing the new sensibilities. Piano and flute went very well together for some time, sharing numerous sonatas in which all the features of a new emotional language were developed.

Leclair’s Violin

Thursday 24 November 2011, 20:00

Artists
Adrian Butterfield
Francis Colpron

Chapelle Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours
Website
400, rue Saint-Paul Est [métro Champ-de-Mars], Vieux-Montréal, Québec

  • Regular: 28,00$
  • Senior: 23,00$
  • Student: 10,00$

Tickets Boréades Store
Admission: 514-790-1245

Program

Adrian Butterfield, violin – Chamber Music

When 67-year old Jean-Marie Leclair was stabbed to death in his garden on October 12, 1764, a reporter wrote that the murderer (or murderers) were “monsters who belong neither to their country nor their century.” Leclair, whose works are now rarely performed, was, next to Rameau, the most important composer during the reign of Louis XV. Leclair was a great violinist. Unlike Rameau, Leclair left us almost exclusively instrumental works: collections of sonatas for violin and for flute, trio sonatas, and concertos, all of very high quality. With their melodic beauty, careful harmony, sophisticated but never ponderous construction, and constantly interesting instrumental lines, Leclair’s works never lapse into the somewhat easy lightness of the galant style then fashionable.

Telemann’s Table

Thursday 6 October 2011, 20:00

Artists
Francis Colpron

Chapelle Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours
Website
400, rue Saint-Paul Est [métro Champ-de-Mars], Vieux-Montréal, Québec

  • Regular: 28,00$
  • Senior: 23,00$
  • Student: 10,00$

Tickets Boréades Store
Admission: 514-790-1245

Program

The (almost) complete first volume of Tafelmusik

“In our music, we have come to rely solely upon ourselves; and we know how to treat the beauties of French and Italian music in a more skillful and profound manner.” The extraordinary collection entitled Tafelmusik (Table Music) that Telemann published in 1733 was very much part of Germans’ new awareness of their artistic importance and national genius for music. The work was presented in three ‘productions’ (i.e., volumes), each consisting of an orchestral overture à la française, followed by a suite, a quartet, a concerto à l’italienne, a trio, a ‘solo’, and a concluding piece using the same instrumentation as the overture, and thus confirming the cyclic character of the ‘production’. In this work, with its extraordinary melodic riches and marvelously skillful writing, Telemann surpassed himself.