Season 2004-2005

Concerts

La tempête et le chardonneret
Tuesday 26 April 2005

Sensibilité 1750
Thursday 24 February 2005

Charpentier instrumental
Friday 12 November 2004

The London Scene
Friday 17 September 2004

Artistic Director’s Note

Dear music lovers

For this our ninth season, we, Les Boréades promise our faithful public, and all music lovers, to continue to breathe life into the must beautiful works of the baroque and classical repertoire. Sonatas, trios, quartets, concertos, suites, and cantatas, of varying sizes and for all kinds of ensemble, and whether Italian, French, English, or German – we will embrace them and get to know their very essences.

While continuing to explore chamber music – naturally enough, given the makeup of our ensemble – we will also tackle more works demanding larger forces. Whether in small or larger groupings, the musicians of Les Boréades wish, above all, to apply their experience and skill to communicate the particular spirit of each work. With our characteristic attention to timbre, musical rhetoric, energy, and virtuosity, we wish to breathe youthful life into music that it is only a few centuries old.

At the very heart of the art of the baroque is the desire to convince and to unite people … This is our goal: to dazzle, to touch, to give pleasure to the senses and to stimulate minds. Do talk about us to your friends.

Francis Colpron

La tempête et le chardonneret

Tuesday 26 April 2005, 20:00

Artists
Francis Colpron
Hélène Plouffe
Susie Napper

Salle Pierre-Mercure – Centre Pierre-Péladeau
Website
300, boulevard de Maisonneuve Est [métro Berri-UQAM], Montréal, Québec

  • Regular: 0,00$
  • Senior: 0,00$

Program

The concertos from Vivaldi’s Opus X

Attention: Date and location have changed!

Like many Italian composers of his time, Vivaldi was first and foremost a violinist. His work with the orphan-musicians of La Pietà nevertheless led him to write sonatas and concertos for all the instruments in use at the time and that his students played well. At the end of the 1720s, one of his colleagues was the flutist Ignaz Sieber. In view of the growing popularity in Venice of the transverse flute, Vivaldi published a collection of six concertos for the instrument. Even though four of these are revisions of previous compositions, some for recorder, together these pieces show an inspiration and poetry unique among Vivaldi’s work.

Sensibilité 1750

Thursday 24 February 2005, 20:00

Artists
Francis Colpron
Hélène Plouffe
Marten Root
Susie Napper

Chapelle Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours
Website
400, rue Saint-Paul Est [métro Champ-de-Mars], Vieux-Montréal, Québec

  • Regular: 28,00$
  • Senior: 18,00$
  • Student: 12,00$

Program

Works for two flutes by WF Bach, CPE Bach and Johann Friedrich Gräfe, with the Dutch flautist Marten Root

This concert will feature a Dutch flutist who is highly visible in the international baroque music scene. Marten Root, artistic director of the Schönbrunn Ensemble and first flute of the Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique of John Eliot Gardiner, will join Les Boréades in a program of sonatas, duets and trios for two flutes, selected from the vast repertoire of the late baroque and early classical periods. By this time, the transverse flute had definitively replaced the recorder. The flute’s expressive possibilities made it, especially in Germany, the perfect vehicle for the new sensitivity being communicated through music.

Ce concert sera également donné le vendredi 25 février 2005 à 20h à la Chapelle Historique du Bon-Pasteur (514-872-5338) et le dimanche 27 février 2005 à 15h au Stewart Hall de Pointe-Claire (514-630-1220).

Charpentier instrumental

Friday 12 November 2004, 20:00

Artists
Francis Colpron
Hélène Plouffe

Chapelle Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours
Website
400, rue Saint-Paul Est [métro Champ-de-Mars], Vieux-Montréal, Québec

  • Regular: 28,00$
  • Senior: 18,00$
  • Student: 12,00$

Program

Sonata for 8, Concert for 4, noëls, etc.

Marc-Antoine Charpentier produced a considerable body of mostly vocal and religious work, in which he managed to combine the expressive suppleness of the Italian style and the delicacy of the French. His work does, though, include diverse instrumental compositions of great originality. Some of these were destined for the church, but the most important were composed while the composer was in the service of the Duchess of Guise. Among these we find the first sonata written in France, a masterpiece of sonorous refinement. As revealed in his instrumental music as well as in his vocal compositions, Charpentier was without doubt the most learned, the most diverse, and the most sensitive composer of seventeenth-century France.

The London Scene

Friday 17 September 2004, 20:00

Artists
Francis Colpron
Hélène Plouffe
Karina Gauvin

Chapelle Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours
Website
400, rue Saint-Paul Est [métro Champ-de-Mars], Vieux-Montréal, Québec

  • Regular: 28,00$
  • Senior: 18,00$
  • Student: 12,00$

Program

Airs and cantatas by Purcell and Handel with the well-known Canadian soprano Karina Gauvin

London figured very early among the most important cities for music in Europe. English musicians of the seventeenth century, who were discerningly open to Italian and French influences, cultivated a truly original national style. The greatest among them, Henry Purcell, left a body of work unique in its variety and depth of expression. Around 1700, however, when England was gaining new importance as a nation, its capital, despite some surges of patriotism, was invaded by foreign musicians and opened its doors to Italian opera. George Frideric Handel was the champion of bel canto for more than thirty years; nevertheless, because of the grandeur of his style and its adaptation to English tastes, he is considered to be the greatest musician to have lived in the British Isles.